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in the south. from texas up to maryland, we can use the public toilet. my high school class couldn't take picture on the capitol lawn of south carolina. we were away then from the american promise. >> reporter: it might have been given those circumstances, it might have been understandable if martin luther king preached retribution. but he did not do that. some members of the civil rights movement then criticized him for it. malcolm x refused to come to the march on washington. he called it the farce on washington. king, as we all know now was all about nonviolence. listen up. >> one of the things that my father was really trying to say not just 50 years ago but 50 years ago, 49, 48, 47, all the way, 45 when he was as isnated, he was really speaking to us about our humanity. and understanding our interconnectedness and interrelatedness. that is why he talked about sitting down at the table of brotherhood. in other words, us understanding that we are one huge human family. yes, there are a lot of different races but we are a human family. that is why he talked about not judging by the colo
colleague, ted poe, a cowboy boot-wearing conservative republican from texas could agree on, you would have said, not much. today we are partners in an issue, however, that makes sense regardless of your politics. ensuring sustainable equitable access of clean water for nearly 800 million women, men and children who don't have it and 2.5 billion without the most basic sanitation services. ted poe and i think that politics should stop with water. that's why today we're introducing the paul simon water for the world act of 2013. since congress passed the paul simon water for the poor act in 2005, the united states has become a global leader in efforts to increase access to clean water and sanitation, developing and implementing some of the most innovative approaches to help those in greatest need. we must not only maintain this progress but work to further refine and focus the efforts at usaid and the department of state by enacting the world act. we are committed because dirty water and lack of sanitation fects all areas of development assistance. especially the case when it comes to women a
in for candy crowley and this is state of the union. >>> today a texas lightning rod. >> if we see a grass roots tsunami, that is going to be cause republicans and democrats to listen to the people. senator ted cruz on why he hopes the wave that carried him into the senate is still strong enough to wash away obamacare. and jim demint and former governor howard dean. >> i think we're going to have another constitutional crisis in terms of the presidency. >>> plus the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. we start with breaking news out of syria this morning. the syrian government has reached an agreement with the united nations to allow inspectors full access to any site of any purported chemical weapons attack. syria's deputy foreign minister says -- the pentagon has prepositioned four warships with armed cruise missiles pore the region. chris, this is big news, this is why obviously inspectors got there, they want to get to the bottom of what really happened. think they can now? >> it is possible, we know that secretary of state john kerry was speaking with his counterpart the fore
show up in washington, asking congress to do things like not annexed texas. it was seen as a great slave conspiracy, which it was. end slavery and the district of columbia. many of these were gathered by women, and many women sign these petitions. what you get is women actively participating in politics to change america for the better. the other great women's movement is the temperance movement. they are active in movements to prevent prostitution. these are things that are close to what would be considered omesticity for women, but is outside the house. it is in the public space. someone like sarah polk, with the exception of temperance, would have been appalled at what these women were asking for. eventually, by 1848, someone in and a few men, such as frederick douglass, are asking for the right to vote for women. that is a long time in coming. it is beginning at this time. >> headers on the phone from jackson,, mississippi. what is your question? >> i would like to know who ran against james k. polk when he as running for president and did sarah polk play the part? >> polk runs
when there was security in place. >>> and a texas county now considering whether to join a federal lawsuit against its state's own controversial voter i.d. law. we're going to dig into what's happening in texas. the end. lovely read susan. may i read something? yes, please. of course. a rich, never bitter taste cup after cup. 340 grams. [ sighs ] [ male announcer ] always rich, never bitter. gevalia. never bitter. for a strong bag that grips the can... ♪ get glad forceflex. small change, big difference. good and close. discover the new way to help keep teeth clean and breath fresh. new beneful healthy smile food and snacks. he'll love the crunch of the healthy smile kibbles. you'll love how they help clean. with soft, meaty centers, and teeth cleaning texture healthy smile snacks help keep a shine on his smile. it's dental that tastes so good. new beneful healthy smile food and snacks. >>> well, you might say it's a texas-size showdown over voting rights and will now pit state officials against one of the biggest counties in the country. that is dallas county. by a narrow 3-2 vot
on in north carolina legislatively, that's the fraud. what's going on in texas legislatively, that's the fraud. it's a made-up story to go after minorities. it's a made-up story to go after the elderly, the poor, the economically challenged and also to set up a bunch of hoops for the young kids in this country to get involved in the process. i say we can win this fight. but today has to be a wake-up for all americans that we have a long way to go. i want to bring in hillary shelton of the naacp, the grio's joy reid, and also lehigh university professor, james peters peterson. now, we all have our issues and things that we believe in. i lived diversity, i went to a black high school. i saw communities get resourced. back when i was in high school, we had after-school programs, we had resources. there was no idea like, we're not going to fund this school in this district, but we're not going to fund this one for certain reasons. and we are setting a dangerous precedent in this country by accepting the fact that teachers are the problem. that public education is failing all across the board. what
there are people counted as refugees. host: the next caller is a doctor from texas. go ahead. mute television or radio and go ahead. caller: yes, i am a doctor. i have been trying for the last couple of months to go there on my own through u.s. agencies. i have e-mailed and called to see if there's opportunity for me to go there and work. i have not gotten any answers. i just got an e-mail a couple of weeks ago. i have been trying for months of on e-mail and phone. there is an opportunity to go, but you would have to come as a consultant, as an intern to work because you are not a licensed physician in syria and cannot work over there. could i go through you to go and help? i work for 15 days and it 15 days off. i do want to work a little bit over there. guest: thank you for your call. you are very generous with your time. it can be greatly appreciated. i think you have a better chance of being able to volunteer or devote your time working with a non-governmental organization than by applying directly to an agency. there are groups you can consult. there are umbrellas of non- governmental org
. then concern about the recent roll back, especially in north carolina and texas and florida of voting rights and that we have to make sure we are diligent and stay on it. so that the dream, have we made progress? absolutely. but we still have a lot of work to do and we have got to make sure that as reverend lowrie said we came to commemorate and we have to agitate in our districts and that is important and dr. king would want us to continue to move on and work hard as john lewis says and still have the comeback. i think we are feeling the effects today of a southern strategy put together by richard nixon some time ago to dilute the power of african-american legislators. we have less power in the sense we are not in houses where we are in the majority. and so we have got to figure out how we work that and we need people to come out to vote like never before, especially in local elections, city council and state assemble and state senates and mayoral election p.m. that makes the difference on the bigger ends so the african-americans have the power that dr. king dream was all about. >> the drea
as well, west texas is closed between know west texas is a major thorough fair. >> it is, buzz i want to be clear it is north texas street that's closed. north texas street from dixon hill to atlantic avenue. >> gail, we saw earlier the fire went roaring right up a hillside. there were a lot of homes in the area. has the fire been stopped on that hillside, and are anymore homes threatened at this moment? >> i don't have a report from the field that anymore homes are threatened at this point. they have not said they're contained yet, though. >> in addition to the evacuation center that's been set up at fairfield high school, is the red cross or any other agencies on the scene there to assist those who have been forced from their homes? >> typically, the red cross comes out. i haven't got an call in that the red cross has made it on scene, but typically they're there within minutes of the fire scene. i will have confirmation on that within the next half hour. >> you mentioned five homes were burn. how many destroyed? looked from the pictures we saw, at least two were destroyed. >> we ha
to those states. we're on our way to north carolina. we're on our way to texas. we're on our way to florida. and when they ask us for our voter id, take out a photo of medgar evers, take out a photo of goodman, chaney, viola louisa. they gave their lives so we could vote. look at this for the, a and it gives you the idea of who we are. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> i gach enough blood on that bridgidge selma, alabama for the right to vote. i'm not going to stand by and let the supreme court take the right to vote away from us. you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out and get in the way. >> congressman john lewis at yesterday's march on washington, 50th anniversary, invoking the historical legacy for voting equality, a struggle that very
was wounded in an automobile driving into the downtown dallas along with the governor of texas. they have been taken to the hospital where their condition as yet unknown. we haven't been told their condition at dallas and a downtown hotel room a group has been gathered to hear president kennedy awaiting his arrival. let's head down there now where we are on the air. >> as you can imagine there are many stories that are coming in to the actual condition of the president. one is that he is dead. this cannot be confirmed. another is that the governor is in the operating room. this we have not confirmed. the president was whisked from the scene of the attempted assassination or assassination, depending upon his condition this hour to the hospital, and the president undoubtedly in the emergency room at the hospital would be on the first floor of the apartment. we are awaiting something more officials that is of course difficult certainly to go on the reports back at the cbs newsroom in new york. we have just been advised of dallas the diffusions are being governed to president kennedy. let us recal
'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >> welcome back to al jazeera. you've been watching coverage of the 50th anniversary of the march in washington. to other stories. >>> president obama is meeting with security advisers at the white house to discuss the u.s. response to alleged chemical weapons attack in syria. just this morning, a medical group with doctors without borders say they have streete td 1300 people from toxic poison. mike, these pictures, they're striking. every time you see them. the pictures of these victims, w
on twitter using the #dreamday. >>> in texas tonight, the death penalty for nidal hasan. former army psychiatrist who went on a deadly rampage at fort hood nearly four years ago, an attack that's been called the deadliest act of terrorism on american soil since 9/11. mark potter has been covering the trial and reports tonight from texas. >> reporter: it took nearly four years after the fort hood shooting rampage in which 13 were killed, and 31 wounded for nidal hasan, the convicted gunman to be convicted and sentenced to die. the panel ordered he be dismissed of the army and stripped of his pay. the decisions were unanimous as the sentence was read, hasan looked at the jury and judge, but had no apparent reactions. those would come from the victims' families who spoke after the sentencing. joe lean cahill lost her husband michael cahill when he was shot trying to stop hasan's attack. >> today a weight has been lifted off of my shoulder. he has been held accountable for his actions, and the panel gave him justice. >> reporter: in arguing for the death sentence the prosecutor, colonel
the real protections we've had, and you saw right away in texas. >> within hours. >> within hours, texas had enacted a reapportionment plan that a three-judge federal court in washington declared not only was in effect, but intentionally rachellely discriminatory and therefore illegal, as soon as they threw out the fact that texas had to get such laws clear, texas announced they would institute -- they would effectuate the all right declared racially discriminatory redistricting plan, and states are coming up with all these different voter suppression items. so yes, that plus the effects on the judiciary, and another thing, we've had increasingly in the last 20 years draconian minimum -- mandatory minimum sentences, which means that a prosecutor, not a judge, really hat the negotiating leverage. the prosecutor says to a defendant if i don't plead guilty, i'll give you a 30-year sentence. if you ploo ed guilty, we'll make it six months. and the odds -- the disparity is so great that there's tremendous pressure, especially when there isn't adequate legal representation on innocent defendan
right to the vote, dmierth line a and texas keep dreaming, revive the war on poverty. keep dreaming, to go from stop and frisk to stop and employ, educate, stop and house. >> as we gather today, 50 years later, there their march is now our march and it's to go on. >> merley evers williams also focus on the future singling out the controversy surrounding the stand your ground laws and calling on supporters to flip the meaning of those laws. >> stand your ground in terms of fighting for justice and equality. >> martin luther king iii also address the crowd >> this is not the time for nostalgic commemoration or for self congratulatory celebration. the task is not done. the journey is not completely. we can and we must do more. >> the reverend al sharpton was the keynote speaker and talked about the political issues facing minorities today, including the recent supreme court ruling that eliminated key provisions of the landmark voting rights act of 1965. >> we earned the right to vote with protest and we will regain what we lost in the supreme court. we'll protest with a appropriate tes
are inside the park. >>> health officials in texas are working to contain a measle outbreak. it is contained to a dallas church where 21 people have gotten sick so far. >>> celebrating the march on washington mall. where dr. martin luther king called for equal rights for all. thank you so much, i'm morgan radford. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. can you say stocktopussy? g102 2 more news. ♪ >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one h
news in texas. suspended quarterback johnny manzell has denied accepting any money for autographs. >>> slaughtering animals before games, the animal rights group peta has sent a message to uefa, the day before the championship league, venus williams fails to make it to the final round of the grand slam. at 33 years old williams was the oldest player to make the second round, have more sports news coming up in about 20 minutes. >> michael thank you. in california tonight there is a desperate shortage of foster parents. coming up we'll tell you what's been done to find children safe and loving homes. >>> keeping at least a dozen mosques under surveillance. what it means for people who attend them next on al jazeera. >> welcome back to al jazeera. i'm john siegenthaler. here's a look at the headlines. president obama says he's convinced that syria did use chemical weapons against its own people. during an interview with pbs, he says he has not made a final decision about how the united states should respond. >>> if man convicted of the killing at fort hood was sentenced. nidal hasan'
on this sunday. texas senator ted cruz is unwavering in his calls to repeal obama care in its entirety, even if it results in a government shutdown. here's the senator this morning. >> obama care is the biggest job killer in this country. there's bipartisan agreement that it isn't working, that it's killing jobs, that it's forcing people to have their hours forcibly reduced to 29 hours a week, that it's driving up the cost of health insurance, that it's causing people to lose their health insurance because businesses are dropping it. >> we thought that necessitated a little sunday fact checking. joining me live, health care reporter for the "huffington post," jeffrey young, and managing editor of fact, nonpartisan. laurie, let me start with you. you looked at the impact of obama care on employment, and full-time workers. are we going to see layoffs or hours cut because of obama care? >> well, i can't really predict what might happen in the future. but the one claim we've looked at is that people seeking full-time work can only find part-time jobs. specifically the republican nation
a possible death sentence. nbc's mark potter joins me live now from ft. hood, texas. mark, good afternoon. what can you tell us about this verdict? >> reporter: well, hi, mara. that verdict came after about seven hours of deliberations by the u.s. army jury panel. as you said, they found nidal hasan guilty of all charges. they reached that verdict unanimously. he was found guilty of 13 counts of premeditated murder, 32 counts of premeditated attempted murder. hasan showed no signs of emotion in the courtroom. family members were there. they were silent, as instructed by the judge, but some of them were in tears. hasan, who never offered up a defense, never gave a closing statement, now faces a sentencing hearing beginning here at ft. hood on monday at 9:00 a.m. 13 membof the family members, e one of them representing the 13 people killed in that rampage, will be allowed to speak to the panel. the government will also have some expert witnesses. the most important point is that prosecutors will be seeking the death penalty. the other option is life in prison. we do not know in nidal hasan
to be anything more than a senator from texas. >> we're going to take back america. >> i have people who want to we want to take our country backing >> it is 50 years after dr. king's speech. >> where are we going? >> if dr. king was here, i'm sure he would say congratulations on the progress that's been made. >> does affirmative action and special treatment need to end? >> let's keep going. the dream is not fully achieved yet. >> we must give our young people dreams again. >> what's going on about voting rights is down right evil. >> they claim there's widespread abuse. nothing substantiates that. >> there is some forces want to the create this sense of fear. >> we're having a tremendous amount of this black on white violence. >> they think the country is moving too fast. instead of bringing racial harmony, having an african-american president has exacerbated the problem, >> the country's not the same country. >> it's always somethinging thering to stir up controversy. >> joining us now is maria teresa coo kumar and jonathan capehart of the "washington post" as well as james peterson, direct
. and james farmer, who had attended college in texas and howard university. worked with the n.a.a.c.p. and later became the head of corps the congress racial equality. and roy wilkins head of the n.a.a.c.p. grew up in minnesota. he was a warrior he was a fighter. and then young martin luther king, jr.. born in georgia, man that i admired, i loved. he was my inspiration. >> and then you? myself. the youngster. i was young. i was really young. so i grewvc:÷ up very poor in rl alabama and growing up, i saw the signs that said white men, colored men, white women, colored women. and i come and ask my mother and my father and my grandparents why? and they said that is the way it is. don't get in the way. don't get in trouble. i was 15 years old in 1955. i heard of rosa parks. i heard the words of martin luther king, jr. on the radio. the action of rosa parks and the words and leadership of dr. king inspired me. i was deeply inspired and i wanted to do something. i wanted to bring down the signs. >> john f. kennedy was not a fan of thicd march originally. >> he did not like the idea
. that was 225 thundershow,000 pe. people have come from all over. met two women from texas and i want to talk to some gentlemen who have come all this way from my earth state of kansas from the wichita area. roosevelt and dean. how important was it for you to be here, roosevelt? >> it was very important for me to be attorney 50 years ago and born and raised in mississippi and to experience the things i experienced growing up there and now to have a passion in wichita, kansas to create jobs from young black men to get them out of gangs and get them off the streets and this atmosphere. i think back to my grandfather and great grandfather and uncles that went through what they went through that myself would have just a chance, an opportunity that i have now. it is uawesome for me ps this i a once in a lifetime experience and one i never will forget. >> enjoy the day today. this is a picture what dr. king wanted to see for america. how important is it for you to to be here today? >> here to celebrate the dream, to continue the dream. it's not over. you know? as long as there is a disproportionate
that you talk about, you take legal means, legal action-- the attorney general is suing the state of texas over voter id. he's talking about rolling back mandatory minimum sentences. and at the same time, the supreme court seems to be heading in the opposite direction. how do you get done what say you want to get done in leveling that playing field? >> well, i would distinguish between civil rights issues, voting rights issues, some of the core legal protections that came about in 1964. you know, in those areas, it's true that we've had some opinions, the most prominent one being the case where the roberts court struck down a key segment of the voting rights act, where we just have to try a whole range of approaches to make up for those decisions so i will be working with people like john business and reaching out to both republicans and democrats in congress to see if congress is prepared to amend the voting rights act, to ensure that people are not being prevented from voting. but congress doesn't move real quickly around here, and if we can go ahead and move administratively, so that ou
say men. joining me now is representative from texas gsheila jackson lee. we went to church for a moment. >> i represent a poster child state that gave birth to lyndon baines johnson who took the message of martin king and the -- being driven by martin king and passed the civil rights act with the congress at that time, republicans and democrade, and the 1965 voting act. what i'm hoping in this spiritual moment that is not only the people who have gathered on the mall, and it is a momentous occasion. it's a beautiful sight. but i really want to hopefully share with those who are in their hospital beds or those who are in their offices and their schools, or at their offices about this moment. this is a moment for america to come together. >> yeah. you know, president clinton said that the people that came before him, the john lewises, the dr. martin luther king jr. of the world, we should honor them and honor how brave they are. van jones, there were moments there throughout these speeches. we went back to the '80s with president carter. back to the '90s with bill clinton. th
.d. rules. in texas, they relaunched a voting map previously blocked because it was found that texas designed that map to discriminate minority voters. that's illegal. but it's much harder to patrol now. joining us now is historian gary may, the author of "bending toward justice: the voting rights act and the transformation of american democracy." thanks for being here and tell us the theory of your book about how this act got passed. >> well, basically this is a people's history of the voting rights act. while ideal with various legal questions that have come up and also the congressional maneuvering that led to the passage of the act in 1965 and its subsequent reauthorizations, the heart of the book is really about the unsung heroes, the people whose names most americans have never even heard of and their struggle to win the right to vote. they put everything on the line, their jobs, their homes, and often their lives. and their courage is just extraordinarily transforming. i think there are lessons in the book to deal with some of the things we're faced with now. >> well, gary, yo
dozens of others on an army post in texas. now the fort hood shooter is sentenced to die. moments ago, movements on syria from inside the white house directly from the president. his words just ahead. the administration considers its next move. >> assad regime was responsible for these chemical weapons and this attack. >> but some lawmakers are telling the white house not so fast. and syria says back off. >> someone sprayed all over the walls. >> also american pilots on a dangerous mission. >> they fly these planes over a target house. >> word of a secret weapon in the fight against mexican drug cartels. >> and -- >> i have a dream. >> -- exactly 50 years later. >> ♪ for the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave >> america remembers the march on washington. >> eventually the white house changed. >> and the man who shared a dream. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last! >> i'm harris faulkner in tonight for shepard smith. the u.s. plans to release evidence this week to show the syrian 1:00 government was behind a chemical attack that killed hun
in one summer. between the far reaches of texas and the atlantic ocean in 1964, the very first ones came up. the chapter right in the middle shows how the power of race and the power of this movement really drove partisan politics in ways that people do not appreciate today. that is part of our misremembering. we do not want to remember how powerful a force race can be in our politics. tavis: this was really one of the greatest movements, but what does your study of this era say about the through line that allows us to go from moment to momentum to movement. you can talk about drones or others. >> that is a wonderful question. that is what i talked to my students about. i am trying to teach this history myself. the inspirational thing, the college kids, starting in 1960 and the freedom ride, they argued about this all night. what is our responsibility? what is the citizen's role? do we have a role, even if they say we are not citizens and cannot vote? the inspirational thing about someone like diane nash, even if we are not allowed to vote, we can move the country towards a situation whe
dad wasn't, but my mother was a little prejudice. you know, arkansas and texas. i never spentand -- i mean, we never picked up on that. so i don't know. when you say you did your own job about that, she knew how i felt. but she could have gone the other way. who knows? but she had that love of humanity. i love when she said "i don't know why people, when they enter a room, don't smile enough. because when you do that, the whole world opens up to you. i can honestly say i feel joy on a daily basis." that was who she was. tavis: how does a mother process having a daughter asked her to finish her work? that is an admission that i won't make it. >>) yet. -- right. yep. i wanted to be able to say to her i would do it. but i had to be honest. as i say, her request had been a burden until they figured out, you know, we can do even more , by letting showing the reader in on who carrie was rather than just finishing her story, which is in this -- interesting in its own. so once i got the key of how to do this, i just started on my computer. i write on the computer. i swear, i felt her on my ri
to low 90s and in texas, we'll also be in the 90s. it will be hot but chance of a shower, but most of the wet weather from the southwest from topical storm evo. we are going to see the storm bring more moisture and thunderstorms into the southwest, tracking up towards the midwest. it's going to start getting hot, too, for minnesota as that humidity moves in. it is going to feel pretty uncomfortable but typical temperatures for the southwest. rain as well, but watch out for the thunderstorms because they could peek out. minneapolis, around 87. we will see how the clouds clear out. even if you are in the 80s, it will be uncomfortable from the humidity. >> rebecca, thank you. >>> 50 years later, and still realizing the dream. remembering martin luther king, jr.'s famous march on washington and reflecting on just how far the country has come. >>> i have a dream. my 4 little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. [applause.] >> neck week marks the 50th anniversary of mar
in texas and north carolina and other places they're coming with all these schemes. voter i.d. well, we always had i.d. why do we need new i.d. now? we had i.d. when we voted for johnson. we had i.d. when we voted nixon. we had i.d. when we voted for those that succeeded him, carter, reagan, bush, clinton, bush again. why when we get to obama do we need some special i.d.? but i tell you what we going to do. when we leave washington, we getting ready to march. we're going to go to those states. we're on our way to north carolina. we're on our way to texas. we're on our way to florida. when they ask us for our voter i.d., take out a photo of medgar evers. take out a photo of viola, they gave their lives so we could vote. look at this photo. it gives you the i.d. of who we are. second, we need jobs. we didn't come here to just talk. we want voter legislation. we need jobs. if we can't get jobs, we need to continue these marches and if we get tired, we need to sit down in the offices of some of those here that don't understand folk want to work and earn for their families. 50 years ago, dr.
. in fort hood, texas a convicted killer is waiting to be sentenced. nidal hasan is the man responsible for the 2009 fort hood shooting. she joining us now live from fort hood. heidi where are we in the trial now? >> well just moments ago, dell, hasan spoke, saying he has no closing statement in this punishment phase of the trial, no surprise to anyone here. he's mainly stayed silent out there this court-martial. you contrast that to what we heard from the government earlier this morning in their closing argument. painstakingly going into detail about these victim impact statements we heard through these last two days of the families left behind from the victims that hasan shot. the 13 people who lost their lives on november 5th, 2009. colonel mike mulligan opening his closing argument by telling the jury, quote, death. he was trained as a doctor to save lives, but on five november he only death death. he dealt no compassion, no understanding, no exceptions, he only dealt death. that's the argument that the jury will soon start deliberating. and now that we know that hasan is make nothi
kaine, joaquin castro from san antonio, texas, and a highlight so far as been the music. two-thirds of the trio peter paul and mary sang blowing in the wind. and un ambassador, major of atlanta, he got up there and belted out some spiritual songs that were popular in the heyday of the civil rights moment. at this moment we're hearing from the widow of med -- med ger evers. and earlier we heard from melanie campbell. she had some very strong words about a topic that is on the forefront of many people's minds here today. let's listen. >> today racism and inequality does not manifest itself in a white sheet, jim crow laws, poll taxes or barking dogs, but the dogs are still biting in other ways. today there are no white sheets, but there are judges in black robes in the u.s. supreme court who struck down section 4 of the voting rights act, opening the flood gates in many states to pass more voter id laws, to block people of color, and young people from voting. >> and there you have it. a clear reference to the supreme court decision earlier this summer to strike down -- gut esse
from matthew mcconaughey's film. "texas buyers club." the sex symbol lost 47 pounds in three months for the role. very, very scrawny. >>> sentenced to 270 days in jail for assault and nations to michael buble and his wife who welcomed baby boy noah into the world. got to be a crooner. >> can you imagine the lullabies that baby is going to get sung. >> with the family. >> oh, for sure. >> i'm richard lui and we remember the 50th anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech on the washington mall there at the martin luther king memorial. >>> leading the news, the "new york times" has a great story for james harris, a dream fulfilled. he was 16 years old when watched dr. king's speech on tv. harris went on to become the nfl's first full time starting quarterback. >>> and in the "wall street journal," jitters over syria hit markets again. stock markets are taking a major hit around the world in anticipation of potential action in siria. >>> topping our news today, speaking of action, senior u.s. officials tell nbc news a three-day u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched a
-old is headed to class: college. carson is a freshman at texas christian university and he is majoring in quantum physics, and says he likes numbers and they help calm him down when he is upset. he was in high school at age five will have a doctorate by age 20. ly mom is with him every day and carries his backpack full of books because carson is too small to lift them. >> he is too cool for school. >> two women from oakland are giving kid a healthy alternative to lunch kits. the two women are former teacher whose founded revolution foods, that turns out low salt, appreciative-free meal kits. >> we focus on creating the meal kit and putting real quality ingredients in there, high quality protein and grains and fruit knack. >> the two women have made build it yourself pizzas, and revolution foods has served 50 million meals. >> so that means since we are doing that story it is back-to-school time. what kind of weather? >> nothing too extreme like in other parts of the country where they are closing school because it is so hot. we probably would like warm weather for the weekend as we clo
if the administration let congress authorize this activity. >> an oil rig explosion near a highway in southwest texas. all employees were evacuated safely and have been accounted for. >> former nfl star turned murder suspect aaron hernandez cut ties with his family and teammates, surrounding himself only with a quote of gangsters. >> a jury has recommended the death penalty for ft. hood shooting suspect nidle hasan. >> a rocket lifted off, carrying a top secret spy satellite for the u.s. >> the san francisco area bracing for a commuter nightmare that will drag on for five days. the busy bay bridge now closed. >> vandalism caught on video. a customer explodes in anger. >> this 11-year-old is not heading to middle school. this 11-year-old is going to college. >> it's basically just like high school. >> and all that matters. >> president obama stood as dr. king did at the linkcoln memorial and addressed a crowd of thousands. >> within the face of impossible odd odds, people who love their country. >> on cbs this morning. >> the trump damagetaj mahal. >> finally, the graduates of trum
, texas [♪ music ] >> in a monumental agreement the national football league has reached a settlement dealing with football related brain injuries. the settlement sets aside $765 million for nearly 4500 retired nfl players. the players claimed in a lawsuit that the league intentionally withheld information relating to concussions. the nfl denies any wrongdoing and insists that safety has always been a top priority. here's a break down of how the money will be dispersed. $675 million will be available for retired players who show symptoms of cognitive impairment. and $10 million will go to a separate research and education fund. >>> the makers of tylenol say they will place a new warning on bottles of the popular painkiller. johnson and johnson said the new red label will tell users that taking too much extra strength tylenol can kill you. aat least minute ten can cause liver failure. it has killed over 500 people a year in the u.s. >>> in the netherlands the schools are going ultra high tech. they're using ipads for everything. the dutch government is plan to go open more of these sch
uninsured people in texas would get health care without the president's law. >> gentlemen, thank you for sharing your views. you know, part of the first amendment is about respecting the views of others. sir? >> joining me now for more on this is msnbc policy analyst "the washington post" columnist ezra klein. the republicans are trying to drum up the support they need to defund obama care. meanwhile, politico reporting that rick perry negotiating with white house officials to accept a hundred million dollars available through aca. talking points memo out with virginia and ohio and michigan that could sign on to obama care medicaid expansion. then add colorado and montana to states that are reporting affordable insurance premiums. do republicans have an inkling they are losing this battle? open vornenrollment is around t corner. >> i would say republicans insofar as you could ever refer to these incredibly fraud party as aiv unified organization now are trying to figure out how to get ted cruz to be quiet and calm down the base a little bit and get into a more reasonable stance in re
to make changes in texas hours after the voting rights act passed and in a place where you can vote if you have a gun i.d. but you can't vote if you have a student i.d. the way the youth are reacting what's happened around trayvon martin and the serious discussions that are happening around racial profiling, the way the youth are activated in a way that's very different this might have been a couple of months ago a march celebrating a moment of history right now we are realizing a moment that is repeating itself in very interesting ways in our community and particularly among the youth standing at the precipice of making a difference. around the dream defenders a lot of things mirroring what you saw in the civil rights movement. >> do you think there are kids that are born today that are color blind? >> i think there is a myth that's been out there for a long time that we are moving a society that is postracial. i think we have made progress but the symbolism of people getting elected and the symbolism of african americans in different positions has some position in relevance. we want to b
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